Covid-19

COVID-19 Resources & Information

Unemployment Claims and Information

  • Unemployment FAQs

    Unemployment

    I am an employee who was laid off due to COVID-19. Am I eligible for unemployment benefits?

    To receive Mississippi unemployment benefits, you must be an employee, you must be monetarily eligible, you must meet the other eligibility requirements, and you must not be disqualified or excluded.

    How do I know if I am considered an “employee” for purposes of unemployment compensation?

    There are several factors MDES looks at to determine if you are an employee.

    Generally, you are an employee if the person for whom you are performing the services has the right to control and directs the manner of your work. If they don’t just tell you what to do, but how to do it, you’re likely an employee.

    If they just give you goals or objectives and you determine how that is to be accomplished, you are likely an independent contractor, not an employee.

    Another important factor is whether the person you’re doing the work for has the right to discharge you; if they do, you’re likely an employee.

    An additional important factor is whether the person you’re doing the work for furnishes you the tools and equipment and workplace or whether you furnish those yourself. If you furnish them, you’re likely not an employee.

    Generally, physicians, lawyers, dentists, veterinarians, contractors, subcontractors, public stenographers, auctioneers, and others who follow an independent trade, business, or profession, in which they offer their services to the public, are independent contractors and not employees.

    Additionally, the proprietors of or partners in a business are not considered employees for unemployment purposes.

    How do I know if I am “monetarily eligible” for Mississippi unemployment compensation benefits?

    To qualify monetarily you must have wages in insured work in the base period equal to forty (40) times that individual’s weekly benefit amount, must have been paid wages in insured work during at least two (2) quarters of the base period, and have no less than $780 in at least one base period quarter. The base period is the first four quarters of the last five full quarters before you filed for benefits.

    What are the other eligibility requirements?

    A monetarily eligible employee must also satisfy each of the following eligibility requirements (except those that have been suspended during the COVID-19 emergency as noted below):

    1. File a claim for unemployment insurance benefits

    2. File Weekly Certifications each week he/she is totally or part – total unemployed;

    3. Participate in reemployment services as defined by MDES;

    4. Be eligible for unemployment insurance benefits and unemployed for a waiting period of one (1) week during each benefit year; (IN EXECUTIVE ORDER 1462, THE GOVERNOR SUSPENDED THE ONE-WEEK WAITING PERIOD FOR CLAIMS FOR UNEMPLOYMENT DUE TO COVID-19)

    5. Be able to work. Unemployment insurance benefits are not paid to those individuals who are not able to work; and

    6. Be available for work. The individual must remain in the labor market, must make a reasonable effort to secure work, and must be willing to accept suitable work when offered. Unemployment insurance benefits are not paid to an individual who removes himself from the labor market and does not choose to work. (IN EXECUTIVE ORDER 1462, THE GOVERNOR SUSPENDED ALL WORK SEARCH REQUIREMENTS FOR UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS RELATED TO COVID-19)

    What would cause me to be disqualified from receiving Mississippi unemployment benefits?

    An employee who is monetarily eligible and who meets the other eligibility requirements may, nevertheless, be disqualified. You will be disqualified and not eligible in any of the following circumstances:

    1. You voluntarily left work without good cause.

    2. You were discharged due to misconduct.

    3. You make a false statement or a false representation of facts, or willfully fail to disclose a material fact for the purpose of obtaining or increasing benefits.

    4. You fail without good cause to either apply for available, suitable work when directed by MDES or fail to accept an offer of suitable work. (IN EXECUTIVE ORDER 1462, THE GOVERNOR SUPSENDED ALL WORK SEARCH REQUIREMENTS FOR UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS RELATED TO COVID-19)

    5. You are unemployed because you participated in a labor dispute that caused a work stoppage (subject to certain exceptions).

    What types of services are excluded from eligibility for Mississippi unemployment benefits?

    Certain types of service are excluded from the definition of employment under the Mississippi Employment Security Law. The following is a partial list of excluded services:

    Services performed:

    1. in the employ of a church;

    2. in the employ of certain religious organizations;

    3. by ordained or licensed ministers;

    4. by public elected officials;

    5. as a member of a legislative body;

    6. as a member of the judiciary of a state or political subdivision;

    7. as a member of the State National Guard or Air National Guard;

    8. as an employee of a governmental entity serving on a temporary basis due to a natural disaster;

    9. in certain governmental policy-making or advisory positions;

    10. in certain facilities in a program for individuals performing rehabilitative or remunerative work;

    11. by an inmate of a custodial or penal institution;

    12. as a part of an unemployment work-relief or work-training program;

    13. as casual labor, not in the usual course of an employer’s business;

    14. by an individual in the employ of his/her son, or daughter, or spouse;

    15. by an individual under the age of 21 in the employ of his/her father or mother;

    16. under the Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act;

    17. in the employ of a school by a student or the spouse of a student under certain conditions;

    18. by an individual who is a student at a nonprofit or public institution, is under the age of 22, and is enrolled in a program which combines academic instruction with work experience;

    19. by a patient of a hospital for that hospital;

    20. by a student nurse or an intern in certain cases;

    21. by an insurance agent or solicitor if remuneration is solely by way of commission;

    22. by an individual under the age of 18 in the distribution of newspapers;

    23. by a barber or beautician leasing a workstation and compensated solely by patrons he/she serves and is free from direction and control by the lessor;

    24. by a real estate agent if remuneration is solely by way of commission.

    If I am not eligible, am disqualified or excluded from receiving Mississippi unemployment compensation, but I am out of work because of COVID-19, what recourse do I have?

    You may be eligible for federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) benefits.

    If I am an employee eligible for Mississippi unemployment compensation due to COVID-19, what are my weekly benefit amounts?

    Your weekly Mississippi unemployment benefit amount is 1/26th of your total wages paid in the quarter of the “base period” where your wages were highest. The base period is the first four quarters of the last five full quarters before you filed for benefits. However, the maximum weekly benefit amount is $235.00.

    If you are awarded Mississippi unemployment compensation benefits for a week, you will also be eligible for $600.00 in Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC) benefits in addition to the state benefits. These federal benefits are available through July 31, 2020.

    If I am eligible for Mississippi unemployment compensation due to COVID-19, when will I receive my benefits?

    Many Mississippians eligible for Mississippi unemployment compensation have already filed their claims and have begun to receive their Mississippi and their federal FPUC benefits due to COVID-19. If you have filed your claim and clearly meet all eligibility requirements, you should begin receiving payment within five to seven business days of filing your claim, or you should have received some type of inquiry or response from MDES. If you have received no communication from MDES within 5 – 7 business days of filing your claim, email your local WIN Job Center at the address found here: https://mdes.ms.gov/win-job-centers/

    Do I still have to provide weekly certifications?

    Yes, whether you are eligible for Mississippi and federal benefits, or federal benefits only, you must still provide the weekly certifications required by MDES.

    Must I provide weekly certifications before I get a claim decision?

    Yes. Even if you have not yet gotten a claim decision, you must provide weekly certifications via the MDES online system.

    I didn’t realize I had to provide weekly certifications before my claim was ruled upon. What do I do?

    MDES tells us that if you have not yet provided weekly certifications, you will be allowed to retroactively provide them. Their preference, however, is for you to make them each week, even before you receive a claim decision.

    If you do not retroactively provide the weekly certification for a week within the time MDES allows you to do so, you will not receive benefits for that week.

    What date do my Mississippi unemployment compensation benefits start from if I lost work due to COVID-19?

    Mississippi unemployment compensation benefits due to COVID-19 start from the date of your separation from employment, not from the date you file your claim.

    Is there a one week waiting period for Mississippi unemployment claims related to COVID-19?

    Normally, you must wait one week after your separation from employment before you are eligible for Mississippi unemployment benefits. However, the Governor suspended the one-week waiting period in Executive Order 1462 for unemployment due to COVID-19. Some COVID-19 claimants may have received benefit payments that did not include the first week after they separated from employment. If you are in this situation you do not need to file another claim related to that first week. MDES has informed us they are reviewing these claims and will issue correction payments.

    I was drawing Mississippi unemployment benefits, but they have now run out. Can I get any more unemployment compensation?

    Individuals who exhaust their Mississippi unemployment compensation benefits and their FPUC benefits will be eligible for payments in the same amounts for 13 additional weeks of Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) if they are able to work, available to work, and actively seeking work.

    I am self-employed and I cannot work due to COVID-19. Am I eligible for Mississippi unemployment compensation benefits?

    No. But, you may be eligible for federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) benefits.

    I work for a church and I was laid off due to COVID-19. Am I eligible for Mississippi unemployment compensation benefits?

    No. But, you may be eligible for federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) benefits.

    I work for a salon where I lease my workstation. I am paid directly by my clients and do not receive compensation from the salon. The salon is closed due to COVID-19. Am I eligible for Mississippi unemployment compensation?

    No. But, you may be eligible for federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) benefits.

    I am not eligible for Mississippi unemployment compensation benefits. Can I get any unemployment compensation due to COVID-19?

    An individual who is not eligible for regular unemployment compensation (UC), extended benefits (EB) under state or federal law, or the 13 weeks of PEUC, may collect Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) under CARES Act section 2102 if they meet certain requirements.

    · This includes independent contractors, self-employed workers, gig workers, etc.

    · The duration of these benefits is limited to 39 weeks, minus any weeks that the individual may have received from regular UC and EB.

    · The amount of these benefits is $600 per week, plus the weekly state unemployment compensation benefit amount.

    · Individuals are eligible if they provide self-certification that the individual is otherwise able to work and available for work within the meaning of applicable State law, except the individual is unemployed, partially unemployed, or unable or unavailable to work because—

    (1) the individual has been diagnosed with COVID–19 or is experiencing symptoms of COVID–19 and seeking a medical diagnosis;

    (2) a member of the individual’s household has been diagnosed with COVID–19;

    (3) the individual is providing care for a family member or a member of the individual’s household who has been diagnosed with COVID–19;

    (4) a child or other person in the household for which the individual has primary caregiving responsibility is unable to attend school or another facility that is closed as a direct result of the COVID–19 public health emergency and such school or facility care is required for the individual to work;

    (5) the individual is unable to reach the place of employment because of a quarantine imposed as a direct result of the COVID–19 public health emergency;

    (6) the individual is unable to reach the place of employment because the individual has been advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine due to concerns related to COVID–19;

    (7) the individual was scheduled to commence employment and does not have a job or is unable to reach the job as a direct result of the COVID–19 public health emergency;

    (8) the individual has become the breadwinner or major support for a household because the head of the household has died as a direct result of COVID–19;

    (9) the individual has to quit his or her job as a direct result of COVID–19;

    (10) the individual’s place of employment is closed as a direct result of the COVID–19 public health emergency; OR

    (11) the individual meets any additional criteria established by the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services for unemployment assistance under this section;

    · An individual who meets one of the eleven (11) conditions above may also be eligible if the individual provides self-certification that he or she is self-employed, is seeking part-time employment, does not have sufficient work history, or otherwise would not qualify for regular unemployment or extended benefits under State or Federal law or PEUC under section 2107.

    · However, if you have the ability to telework with pay, you will NOT be eligible for federal unemployment benefits under the CARES Act.

    · Additionally, if you are receiving paid sick leave or other paid leave benefits, you will NOT be eligible for federal unemployment benefits under the CARES Act, even if you meet one of the eleven (11) ways of qualifying above.

    I am not eligible for Mississippi unemployment compensation, but I believe I may be eligible for federal benefits. When should I file my claim?

    If you have already filed your claim for benefits, the Mississippi Department of Employment Security (MDES) has a record of your claim. Even if you got a notification that you weren’t eligible for state unemployment benefits, MDES will run queries that identify you as a self-employed individual and they will process your claim federal benefits under the CARES Act.

    If you are certain you are not eligible for Mississippi unemployment compensation benefits, and you have not yet filed a claim, MDES is now ready to process your claim for federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) benefits. You can file your claim online at this link https://accessms.mdes.ms.gov/accessms/faces/login/login.xhtml. Or, you can call 1 (833) 919-0334 to speak with a MDES representative about filing your claim for PUA benefits.

    What is the best way for me to file my claim for unemployment compensation benefits due to COVID-19?

    First, try to file your claim online here: https://accessms.mdes.ms.gov/accessms/faces/login/login.xhtml

    I tried to file my claim online, but I was never able to file my claim. What should I do?

    If you cannot access the system, download this printed claim form and fill it out: https://mdes.ms.gov/media/178819/ui-501_form_web.pdf

    Once you have filled out the printed claim form, please email it to your local WIN Job Center at the address found here: https://mdes.ms.gov/win-job-centers/.

    If you are certain you are not eligible for Mississippi unemployment compensation benefits, and you have not yet filed a claim, you may be eligible for federal benefits. You can now file your claim online, or, you can call 1 (833) 919-0334 to speak with a MDES representative about filing your claim for PUA benefits.

    I got a response from MDES that there is an issue with my claim that asked me to call the MDES number within 3 days. I cannot get through to that number. What should I do?

    Email your local WIN Job Center at the address found here: https://mdes.ms.gov/win-job-centers/

    In this email, describe the efforts you made, the date(s) you attempted to contact MDES via phone and any other information you believe is pertinent to MDES’s inquiry about your claim.

    I filed my claim, but now I have been locked out of my account and cannot access the MDES online system. I cannot get through on the phone to MDES. What should I do?

    Email an explanation of your situation and your contact information to [email protected].

  • Overview of Mississippi Unemployment Compensation

    Disclaimer

    The guidance offered here is for informational purposes only and should not be considered legal advice. Only the Mississippi Department of Employment Security (MDES) can make determinations regarding entitlement to Mississippi unemployment compensation. When in doubt, you should file an unemployment claim with MDES and obtain a determination of eligibility.

    OVERVIEW OF MISSISSIPPI UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION

    Mississippi Unemployment Compensation in General

    • To receive Mississippi unemployment benefits, you must be an employee, you must be monetarily eligible, you must meet the other eligibility requirements, and you must not be disqualified or excluded.
    • In certain circumstances an individual may be eligible for federal unemployment benefits even if they are not eligible for state benefits. The guidance in this section on Mississippi Unemployment Compensation relates only to eligibility for state unemployment benefits.
    • The second section, “CARES Act Unemployment Summary,” provides an overview of federal unemployment benefits.

    Who Is An Employee

    • There are several factors MDES looks at to determine if you are an employee.
    • Generally, you are an employee if the person for whom you are performing the services has the right to control and directs the manner of your work. If they don’t just tell you what to do, but how to do it, you’re likely an employee.
    • If they just give you goals or objectives and you determine how that is to be accomplished, you are likely an independent contractor, not an employee.
    • Another important factor is whether the person you’re doing the work for has the right to discharge you; if they do, you’re likely an employee.
    • An additional important factor is whether the person you’re doing the work for furnishes you the tools and equipment and workplace or whether you furnish those yourself. If you furnish them, you’re likely not an employee.
    • Generally, physicians, lawyers, dentists, veterinarians, contractors, subcontractors, public stenographers, auctioneers, and others who follow an independent trade, business, or profession, in which they offer their services to the public, are independent contractors and not employees.
    • Additionally, the proprietors of or partners in a business are not considered employees for unemployment purposes.

    Total unemployment versus part total unemployment

    • Total unemployment: Most people understand that they are considered totally unemployed if they are not working at all. Mississippi law is consistent with this understanding. “An individual is considered totally unemployed during any week in which they perform no services and in which no wages are payable to him or her.” MDES Regulation 313.00 (emphasis added).
    • Part total unemployment: In certain circumstances, an employee is considered unemployed if their hours are reduced, but they are still working.
    • You can be considered part unemployed for a given week based on the number of hours you worked and the amount you earned. MDES Regulation 313.00. Follow these steps to determine if you are considered “part total unemployed” for a given week.
      • Step 1. Analyze your hours. If you worked more than 35 hours per week, then you are not considered part total unemployed and are considered a full time employee. If you work lessthan 35 hours in a week, you may be considered “part total unemployed.” Go to Step 2. MDES Regulation 313.00.
      • Step 2.Calculate your weekly benefit amount. If you worked less than 35 hours in a week, you must compare your wages for that week to the weekly benefit amount you would receive to determine if you are part total unemployed.
      • Your weekly benefit amount is 1/26th of your total wages paid in the quarter of the “base period” where your wages were highest. The base period is the first four quarters of the last five full quarters you filed for benefits. However, the maximum weekly benefit amount is $235.00.
      • Step 3.Compare your weekly benefit to your wages. You are considered part totally unemployed for that week if your wages are less than your weekly benefit amount plus forty dollars ($ 40.00). MDES Regulation 313.00.
      • Example.You worked 34 hours for a week and earned wages of $276.00. The maximum weekly benefit amount is $235.00, plus $40.00 totals $275.00. Your hours are less than 35. However, because your wages of $276.00 exceed $275.00, you do NOT qualify as part total employed.

    Monetary eligibility

    To qualify monetarily the individual must have wages in insured work in the base period equal to forty (40) times that individual’s weekly benefit amount, must have been paid wages in insured work during at least two (2) quarters of the base period, and have no less than $780 in at least one base period quarter.

    Other eligibility requirements: A claimant must also satisfy each of the following eligibility requirements (except those that have been suspended during the COVID-19 emergency as noted below):

    1. File a claim for unemployment insurance benefits

    2. File Weekly Certifications each week he/she is totally or part – total unemployed;

    3. Participate in reemployment services as defined by MDES;

    4. Be eligible for unemployment insurance benefits and unemployed for a waiting period of one (1) week during each benefit year; (IN EXECUTIVE ORDER 1462, THE GOVERNOR SUSPENDED THE ONE-WEEK WAITING PERIOD FOR CLAIMS FOR UNEMPLOYMENT DUE TO COVID-19)

    5. Be able to work. Unemployment insurance benefits are not paid to those individuals who are not able to work; and

    6. Be available for work. The individual must remain in the labor market, must make a reasonable effort to secure work, and must be willing to accept suitable work when offered. Unemployment insurance benefits are not paid to an individual who removes himself from the labor market and does not choose to work. (IN EXECUTIVE ORDER 1462, THE GOVERNOR SUSPENDED ALL WORK SEARCH REQUIREMENTS FOR UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS RELATED TO COVID-19)

    Disqualification

    • An employee who is monetarily eligible and who meets the other eligibility requirements may, nevertheless, be disqualified.
    • You will be disqualified and not eligible in any of the following circumstances:
    • You voluntarily left work without good cause.
    • You were discharged due to misconduct.
    • You make a false statement or a false representation of facts, or willfully fail to disclose a material fact for the purpose of obtaining or increasing benefits.
    • You fail without good cause to either apply for available, suitable work when directed by MDES or fail to accept an offer of suitable work. (IN EXECUTIVE ORDER 1462, THE GOVERNOR SUSPENDED ALL WORK SEARCH REQUIREMENTS FOR UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS RELATED TO COVID-19)
    • You are unemployed because you participated in a labor dispute that caused a work stoppage (subject to certain exceptions).

    Exclusions:

    • Certain types of service are excluded from the definition of employment under the Mississippi Employment Security Law.
    • The following is a partial list of excluded services. Services performed:
      • in the employ of a church;
      • in the employ of certain religious organizations;
      • by ordained or licensed ministers;
      • by public elected officials;
      • as a member of a legislative body;
      • as a member of the judiciary of a state or political subdivision;
      • as a member of the State National Guard or Air National Guard;
      • as an employee of a governmental entity serving on a temporary basis due to a natural disaster;
      • in certain governmental policy-making or advisory positions;
      • in certain facilities in a program for individuals performing rehabilitative or remunerative work;
      • by an inmate of a custodial or penal institution;
      • as a part of an unemployment work-relief or work-training program;
      • as casual labor, not in the usual course of an employer’s business;
      • by an individual in the employ of his/her son, or daughter, or spouse;
      • by an individual under the age of 21 in the employ of his/her father or mother;
      • under the Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act;
      • in the employ of a school by a student or the spouse of a student under certain conditions;
      • by an individual who is a student at a nonprofit or public institution, is under the age of 22, and is enrolled in a program which combines academic instruction with work experience;
      • by a patient of a hospital for that hospital;
      • by a student nurse or an intern in certain cases;
      • by an insurance agent or solicitor if remuneration is solely by way of commission;
      • by an individual under the age of 18 in the distribution of newspapers;
      • by a barber or beautician leasing a workstation and compensated solely by patrons he/she serves and is free from direction and control by the lessor;
      • by a real estate agent if remuneration is solely by way of commission.
  • CARES Act Unemployment Summary

    CARES ACT UNEMPLOYMENT SUMMARY

    Disclaimer

    The guidance offered here is for informational purposes only and should not be considered legal advice. The CARES Act delegates administration of the unemployment benefits it provides to the state unemployment agency. Thus, only the Mississippi Department of Employment Security (MDES) can make determinations regarding entitlement to unemployment compensation under the CARES Act. When in doubt, you should file an unemployment claim with MDES and obtain a determination of eligibility.

    CARES Act

    There are two broad categories of persons who will be eligible for federal unemployment benefits, which will be administered by the Mississippi Department of Employment Security (MDES). Persons who are eligible for regular state unemployment benefits will also qualify for federal benefits. Certain persons who do NOT qualify for regular state unemployment benefits and whose unemployment is linked to COVID-19 will be eligible for federal benefits.

    1. Persons who are otherwise eligible for unemployment benefits pursuant to state law (CARES Act §2104, Emergency Increase in Unemployment Compensation Benefits).

    • For persons who are otherwise eligible for state unemployment compensation, in addition to the state unemployment benefits, the Act provides up to $600 per week of federal unemployment benefits. These benefits are available through July 31, 2020.
    • Individuals who exhaust these benefits may be eligible for payments in the same amount for 13 additional weeks under the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) provisions of §2107.

    2. Certain Persons who do NOT qualify for regular state unemployment benefits and whose unemployment is linked to COVID-19 may be eligible for federal benefits. (CARES Act §2102, Pandemic Unemployment Assistance).

    • An individual who is not eligible for regular unemployment compensation (UC), extended benefits (EB) under state or federal law, or the 13 weeks of PEUC, may collect Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) under section 2102 if they meet certain requirements.
    • This includes independent contractors, self-employed workers, gig workers, etc.
    • The duration of these benefits is limited to 39 weeks, minus any weeks that the individual may have received from regular UC and EB.
    • The amount of these benefits is $600 per week, plus the weekly state unemployment compensation benefit amount.
    • Individuals are eligible if they provide self-certification that the individual is otherwise able to work and available for work within the meaning of applicable State law, except the individual is unemployed, partially unemployed, or unable or unavailable to work because—
      • the individual has been diagnosed with COVID–19 or is experiencing symptoms of COVID–19 and seeking a medical diagnosis;
      • a member of the individual’s household has been diagnosed with COVID–19;
      • the individual is providing care for a family member or a member of the individual’s household who has been diagnosed with COVID–19;
      • a child or other person in the household for which the individual has primary caregiving responsibility is unable to attend school or another facility that is closed as a direct result of the COVID–19 public health emergency and such school or facility care is required for the individual to work;
      • the individual is unable to reach the place of employment because of a quarantine imposed as a direct result of the COVID–19 public health emergency;
      • the individual is unable to reach the place of employment because the individual has been advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine due to concerns related to COVID–19; the individual was
      • scheduled to commence employment and does not have a job or is unable to reach the job as a direct result of the COVID–19 public health emergency;
      • the individual has become the breadwinner or major support for a household because the head of the household has died as a direct result of COVID–19;
      • the individual has to quit his or her job as a direct result of COVID–19;
      • the individual’s place of employment is closed as a direct result of the COVID–19 public health emergency; OR
      • the individual meets any additional criteria established by the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services for unemployment assistance under this section;
    • An individual who meets one of the eleven (11) conditions above may also be eligible if the individual provides self-certification that he or she is self-employed, is seeking part-time employment, does not have sufficient work history, or otherwise would not qualify for regular unemployment or extended benefits under State or Federal law or PEUC under section 2107.
    • However, if you have the ability to telework with pay, you will NOT be eligible for federal unemployment benefits under the CARES Act.
    • Additionally, if you are receiving paid sick leave or other paid leave benefits, you will NOT be eligible for federal unemployment benefits under the CARES Act, even if you meet one of the eleven (11) ways of qualifying above.
  • How Do I File an Unemployment Claim?

    As previously reported, MDES is handling an unprecedented number of unemployment claims. Persons wishing to file an unemployment claim should proceed as follows:

    First, try to file your claim online here: https://accessms.mdes.ms.gov/accessms/faces/login/login.xhtml

    If you cannot access the system, download this printed claim form and fill it out: https://mdes.ms.gov/media/178819/ui-501_form_web.pdf

    Once you have filled out the printed claim form, please email it to your local WIN Job Center. Find your local WIN Job Center below.

    After you have filed your claim or emailed with a question, please wait 5 to 7 business days before contacting MDES to follow up.

    Find your local WIN Job Center in the list below.

    WIN Job Center Email Phone
    Amory Job Center [email protected] 662-256-2618
    Attala Job Center [email protected] 662-289-2535
    Batesville Job Center [email protected] 662-563-7318
    Brookhaven Job Center [email protected] 601-833-3511
    Calhoun Job Center [email protected] 662-412-3170
    Carthage Job Center [email protected] 601-267-9282
    Clarksdale Job Center [email protected] 662-624-9001
    Cleveland Job Center [email protected] 662-843-2704
    Columbia Job Center [email protected] 601-736-2628
    Corinth Job Center [email protected] 662-696-2336
    DeSoto County Job [email protected] 662-280-6218
    Forest Job Center [email protected] 601-469-2851
    Greenville Job Center [email protected] 662-332-8101
    Greenwood Job Center [email protected] 662-459-4600
    Grenada Job Center [email protected] 662-226-2911
    Gulfport Job Center [email protected] 228-897-6900
    Hancock Job Center [email protected] 228-466-5425
    Hattiesburg Job Center [email protected] 601-584-1202
    Houston Job Center [email protected] 662- 407-1219
    Indianola Job Center [email protected] 662-887-2502
    Iuka Job Center [email protected] 662-423-9231
    Jackson Job Center [email protected] 601-321-7931
    Laurel Job Center [email protected] 601-399-4000
    Lexington Job Center [email protected] 662-834-2426
    Louisville Job Center [email protected] 662-773-5051
    Madison County Job [email protected] 601-859-7609
    Marshall Job Center [email protected] 662-838-3805
    Mayhew Job Center [email protected] 662-243-1751
    McComb Job Center [email protected] 601-684-4421
    Meridian Job Center [email protected] 601-553-9511
    Natchez Job Center [email protected] 601-442-0243
    New Albany Job [email protected] 662- 407-1226
    Oxford Job Center [email protected] 662-236-7201
    Pascagoula Job Center [email protected] 228-762-4713
    Pearl Job Center [email protected] 601-321-5441
    Picayune Job Center [email protected] 601-798-3472
    Pontotoc Job Center [email protected] 662- 407-1226
    Tate Job Center [email protected] 662-562-3351
    Tupelo Job Center [email protected] 662-842-4371
    Vicksburg Job Center [email protected] 601- 619 -2841
    West Point Job [email protected] 662-243-2647

    MDES is now ready to begin processing Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) claims for federal unemployment benefits for persons who are not eligible for regular Mississippi unemployment compensation, such as the self-employed, gig workers, church workers, etc., and for those who have exhausted their regular Mississippi unemployment compensation.

    If you wish to apply for those federal PUA benefits, you should first apply online as noted above. You can also call 1 (833) 919-0334 to speak with a MDES representative about filing your claim for PUA benefits.

  • MDES - Mississippi Department of Employment Security

    Visit the Mississippi Department of Employment Security website here.

     

     

  • WIN Job Centers

    WIN Job Center Email Phone
    Amory Job Center [email protected] 662-256-2618
    Attala Job Center [email protected] 662-289-2535
    Batesville Job Center [email protected] 662-563-7318
    Brookhaven Job Center [email protected] 601-833-3511
    Calhoun Job Center [email protected] 662-412-3170
    Carthage Job Center [email protected] 601-267-9282
    Clarksdale Job Center [email protected] 662-624-9001
    Cleveland Job Center [email protected] 662-843-2704
    Columbia Job Center [email protected] 601-736-2628
    Corinth Job Center [email protected] 662-696-2336
    DeSoto County Job [email protected] 662-280-6218
    Forest Job Center [email protected] 601-469-2851
    Greenville Job Center [email protected] 662-332-8101
    Greenwood Job Center [email protected] 662-459-4600
    Grenada Job Center [email protected] 662-226-2911
    Gulfport Job Center [email protected] 228-897-6900
    Hancock Job Center [email protected] 228-466-5425
    Hattiesburg Job Center [email protected] 601-584-1202
    Houston Job Center [email protected] 662- 407-1219
    Indianola Job Center [email protected] 662-887-2502
    Iuka Job Center [email protected] 662-423-9231
    Jackson Job Center [email protected] 601-321-7931
    Laurel Job Center [email protected] 601-399-4000
    Lexington Job Center [email protected] 662-834-2426
    Louisville Job Center [email protected] 662-773-5051
    Madison County Job madisoncou[email protected] 601-859-7609
    Marshall Job Center [email protected] 662-838-3805
    Mayhew Job Center [email protected] 662-243-1751
    McComb Job Center [email protected] 601-684-4421
    Meridian Job Center [email protected] 601-553-9511
    Natchez Job Center [email protected] 601-442-0243
    New Albany Job [email protected] 662- 407-1226
    Oxford Job Center [email protected] 662-236-7201
    Pascagoula Job Center [email protected] 228-762-4713
    Pearl Job Center [email protected] 601-321-5441
    Picayune Job Center [email protected] 601-798-3472
    Pontotoc Job Center [email protected] 662- 407-1226
    Tate Job Center [email protected] 662-562-3351
    Tupelo Job Center [email protected] 662-842-4371
    Vicksburg Job Center [email protected] 601- 619 -2841
    West Point Job [email protected] 662-243-2647

Prevention and Preparedness

  • Protecting Yourself and Others

    For Individuals

    • Protect others:
      • Stay home if you are sick and avoid close contact with anyone who is ill.
      • Cover your coughs and sneezes. When possible, cough, sneeze or blow your nose into a tissue, and throw the tissue away.
      • If you are sick, especially with shortness of breath, severe cough, fever or severe chest pain, call a doctor or healthcare provider for instructions on being safely examined.
    • Protect yourself away from home
      • Avoid social and community gatherings where 10 people or more would come into close contact.
      • Practice social distancing advice below when you are in a group of people.
      • Avoid unnecessary (non-urgent) air, bus or train travel.
      • Limit visitation to older relatives or friends (especially in nursing or care homes).
    • Practice protective hygiene
      • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
      • Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly, especially after coughing or sneezing, blowing your nose, and using the bathroom. Effective handwashing takes about 20 seconds, and includes cleaning under fingernails, between fingers, and washing the back of hands as well as the front. More proper handwashing tips »
      • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that are touched often.
      • Stay in good overall health by eating right and staying active. If you are living with diabetes, heart disease or other condition, keep in touch with your doctor and stay current with your treatment.
      • During or before flu season, get a flu shot. Flu vaccination can prevent the flu or make it less severe and decrease your chance of hospitalization and death. It also keeps you healthier and better able to fight off infections.
      • More about preventing the spread of disease

    Families, Women and Children

    For Older Adults and People at High Risk

    • People at risk for serious illness from COVID-19 are adults 65 and over and those with a chronic illness such as heart disease, diabetes, or lung disease. These people should take simple precautions at all times to limit their exposure to others who may be ill:
      • Avoid all social gatherings.
      • Keep more space (6 feet if possible) between you and others as you go through the day.
      • Avoid crowds. When you do go out in public, keep away from others who are sick and limit close contact.
      • Wash your hands often, especially after being in public places.
    • If COVID-19 begins to spread locally, you should stay home as much as possible. Having a supply of important medications and basic supplies can help.

    For Long-Term Care Facilities

    • MSDH recommends discontinuing group social activities.
    • Consider restricting visitation until further notice.
    • Post signs that discourage all nonessential visitation and discourage ill visitors from entering the facility.
    • Visitors should only visit their family members and should not have contact with other residents since they could spread the virus.
    • Visitors should cover their coughs and be educated on the importance of hand hygiene.
    • Keep all ill visitors away from the facility for at least 48 hours after symptoms resolve.
    • Consider limiting visitation by children (especially during community wide outbreaks) and the elderly or those with underlying medical problems that place them at risk.
    • Postpone all groups (like school groups or church groups) from visiting facility — this goes along with discontinuing all group activities.
    • Make sure the facility has plenty of hand washing products and that visitors have access to them.

    Social Gatherings and Events

    • Everyone attending essential events and gatherings should take extra precautions at this time, including:
      • Maintain social distancing as much as practical. A separation of 6 feet from another person is considered effective for infection control.
      • Wash hands frequently and thoroughly soap and water or use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available. Look for sanitizers with at least 60 percent alcohol.
      • If ill, do not attend any public event and call your physician or healthcare provider if needed.
      • Schools throughout the state should consider cancelling any large gatherings, including assembly and social events.
      • CDC recommendation and resources for community events
    • Event organizers: MSDH recommends that communities and organizations contact us at 877-978-6453 to determine whether cancelation is warranted, or appropriate preventive steps for your event.

    In the Community: Schools, businesses, events and other places that people gather should take steps to prevent or limit the spread of viral illness.

    The Mississippi State Department of Health now recommends that all restaurants and bars suspend dine-in service for the foreseeable future and restrict their operations to carry-out or delivery only.

  • COVID Testing and Testing Facilities

    • You can be tested for COVID-19 by local medical providers statewide, or at free drive-through sites held at various locations around the state. You must have qualifying symptoms to be tested.
    • These providers require that you have symptoms of COVID-19 in order to be tested: a fever of 100.4 or greater and severe cough or chest pain.
    • You should call ahead before visiting to make testing arrangements
    • For the most up to date info on COVID-19 testing click here: https://msdh.ms.gov/msdhsite/_static/14,0,420,874.html
    • Testing Site locations are updated regularly, a list of testing facilities can be found here – https://msdh.ms.gov/msdhsite/_static/14,21912,420,874.html
    • Drive Thru Testing
      • One-day drive-through testing locations are offered daily for individuals determined to be high risk for having COVID-19, either at the Mississippi Fairgrounds in Jackson, or regularly at other selected sites across the state. These events are run by MSDH and the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC). Testing at these locations is free of charge.
      • Before visiting a drive-through testing site, you must first be screened by speaking with a UMMC clinician to determine your likelihood of COVID-19 infection. This can be done by phone or by a smartphone app. If the clinician determines that your likelihood of infection is high, you will receive a next-day appointment for drive-through testing.
      • You can find a list of Drive Thru testing locations here. https://www.umc.edu/CoronaVirus/COVID-19-Testing/Home.html
  • Personal Protective Equipment – (PPE)

    Facilities are allowed to order their own supplies. They do not have to request supplies through MEMA.

    As soon as items are received, they’re delivered to areas on the Tier I and Tier III systems.

    TIER I Facility – a hospital/long-term care facility actively treating a COVID- positive patient

    TIER III Facility – Quarantine/Isolation Facilities run by other jurisdictions, skilled nursing facilities, home health agencies, other healthcare facilities, outpatient facilities, EMS and emergency managers.

    If you have a business that would like to help in the COVID-19 fight and assist in other disasters in the future, they can register with MEMA at https://msbeoc.org/

  • MSDH – Mississippi Department of Health

    View the Mississippi Department of Health website here.

  • CDC Instructions On How to Protect Yourself and Others

    Know how it spreads

    • There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
    • The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.
    • The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.
      • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
      • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks.
      • These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.
      • Some recent studies have suggested that COVID-19 may be spread by people who are not showing symptoms.

    Everyone should

    Clean your hands often

    • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
    • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

    Avoid close contact

    Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others

    • You could spread COVID-19 to others even if you do not feel sick.
    • Everyone should wear a cloth face cover when they have to go out in public, for example to the grocery store or to pick up other necessities.
    • Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.
    • The cloth face cover is meant to protect other people in case you are infected.
    • Do NOT use a facemask meant for a healthcare worker.
    • Continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.

    Cover coughs and sneezes

    • If you are in a private setting and do not have on your cloth face covering, remember to always cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
    • Throw used tissues in the trash.
    • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

    Clean and disinfect

President Trump's Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

  • President Trump's Guidelines

    View the President’s Guidelines here.

Paid for by Philip Gunn for Speaker of the House